Op-ed: The untapped benefits of deep energy renovations (FORESIGHT)

Published by FORESIGHT on: 6 December 2019 | As new Members of the European Parliament take their places and the European Green Deal takes shape, it bears repeating that the state of EU buildings holds the potential to make or break whatever energy, emissions and environmental targets are set in the coming months, says Adrian Joyce from Renovate Europe.


Briefing 1/2019: Why Good Health Begins in a Good Homes

April 2018

Good health can come from many sources, but maybe none is as overlooked as the value of a good building.

We spend about 90% of our lives indoors. Most of the air we breathe over our lifetimes is found there. Our buildings’ temperatures, lighting, humidity, draughts and noise can determine our vulnerability to illness. They can even affect our moods and mental wellbeing. The World Health Organisation estimates that 4.3 million people die prematurely each year from exposure to indoor air pollutants. 

Reams of studies on the subject have incontrovertibly linked healthy bodies to healthy buildings. There are many benefits to healthy schools, healthy hospitals, and healthy office buildings, as well as healthy homes.

 

Download the Renovate Europe Briefing 1/2019: Why Good Health Begins in a Good Home

Download the one-page infographic: Why should we carry out health renovations?


Renovate Europe reaches out to safeguard Energy Renovation in InvestEU

Ahead of the trilogues on InvestEU scheduled today Monday 18th and Wednesday 20th, Renovate Europe called on the negotiators to safeguard energy renovation of buildings as an explicit investment area in the Sustainable Infrastructure Window.

 Indeed, article 7§1(a) should explicitly mention “(…) energy efficiency in line with the 2030 energy frameworks, buildings renovation projects focused on energy savings (…)” as in the Parliament position, supported by the Commission potential compromise text.

 Buildings, whether schools, hospitals, police stations, or houses and apartments, are an essential infrastructure in Europe, providing a shelter and a nest to our citizens. They must be renovated in an energy efficient manner to give comfort and wellbeing, ensuring good health for everyone. Funding building renovation is an essential investment in our infrastructure. When we renovate buildings, we are investing in the future safety, productivity and prosperity of the EU. As any other infrastructure, buildings require investment and renewal in order to stay effective and competitive.

This clarification of eligibility would help mobilise financing by bundling projects together, building a pipeline of projects, and giving confidence to investors and the private sector. This would be especially important given that in some Member States, between 40 and 80% of public infrastructure investment comes from the EU Budget.


Op-ed: Time to address Europe’s hot and cold homes crisis (Euractiv)

Published by Euractiv on: 20 February 2019 | Most European countries have significant energy poverty problems and are unable to keep their citizens warm during winter. In fact, that applies as much to cooling as to heating, writes Adrian Joyce.


Op-ed: Commission must not take its eye off the ball for decarbonisation by 2050 (Euractiv)

Published by Euractiv on: 28 November 2018 | The European Commission will need clarity, nerve and vision to chart a decarbonisation path to 2050 that addresses the nearly 40% of Europe’s emissions that currently come from buildings, writes Adrian Joyce.


Op-ed: Efficiency or economy? We can have both… or neither (ECEEE)

Published by ECEEE on: 22 November 2018 | Energy efficiency and a strong economy are sometimes counterposed against each other as if they were a zero-sum choice. “It’s all very well touting luxury renovations, but in the real world investors need a return,” discordant voices will say.  The International Energy Agency’s Energy Efficiency 2018 Outlook study is a useful corrective to this position – so useful in fact, that its neglect in the media was quite shocking.